Here’s my first book: The Rural Pastor

rural pastor picI just recently completed my first book. It’s called The Rural Pastor: Ten Things I Wish I Had Known Before I Began Rural Ministry. You can click on the title above to check it out and order it. I have experienced many years of rural ministry in small communities. I enjoy writing. So I have combined the two to come up with a book.

My hope is that as you read it you will be encouraged in your rural ministry. If you are not a rural pastor right now, this might be just the thing to help you get a sense of how to understand your rural pastor friend and their ministry. I have included some suggestions at the end of each chapter on how to put into practice the things of that chapter.

I hope you enjoy it and feel encouraged in your ministry.

*click here to order.

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Learning from Rural Pastors, from Duke, and from Billy Graham

I am having one of the greatest privileges of my life right now. I am writing while on a “field trip” to North Carolina.

I am on a team with 3 other pastors who lead the Rural Church Pastors Network. We have had the privilege of spending a couple of days with pastors and professors connected to the Duke Divinity School at Duke University. What a great opportunity to learn as we got to visit with three United Methodist pastors and learned how God was working in their churches. It was encouraging to see their passion for rural ministry, their joy of the Holy Spirit, and their love for what they are doing. We were able to sit in on a chapel at Duke as well as help lead a Rural Thriving Communities colloquium on the campus of Duke.

And now we had a day of touring both the Billy Graham Library and the Cove. These are a great tribute to the man and a celebration of what God has done as Billy has faithfully preached Jesus. Billy is nearing the end of his life, but there are many who are continuing the work and ministry of what was begun by his crusades years ago.

The four of us have been talking as we drive and as we eat meals together. It has been a great experience of sharing what we are hearing and learning and as we are listening to God for the future of the Rural Church Pastors Network. God has great things in store. We believe it. We are looking ahead with great anticipation!

I hate the word “busy”.

busyIt’s been a while since I blogged again. It’s been one of those “busy” times. I don’t even like the word. Yes, I have had a full schedule. I have worked with my church to plan and put on a wonderful Easter Eggstraganza that reaches out to many community people. I have been part of planning our next round of Rural Church Pastors Network events that are starting this next week. I have just attended a great Biblical Exposition Workshop. I have had a number of medical appointments in the last while again. I have had ongoing issues with my computer and finally just got it to print last week after not being able to do so for about a month or so. I have had meetings with people in the church and in the community. I have had car issues to fight with. And on and on.

We all find things to fill our life. We call it being “busy”. I would rather call it “having a full schedule”. When I hear the word busy it sounds negative. I don’t want people in my church to ever think I’m too “busy” to spend time with them. I don’t mind telling people I have a full schedule, because I do – and I should. While we were meant to have sabbath rests, we were meant to be living our lives in connection with people and the world around us. We weren’t meant to be doing nothing with our life.

A full schedule is good. The main thing is to make sure that we are in control of our schedules and are not just running at a fast pace because of the expectations of others. We need to realize that WE decide what we do with our day. As a small church pastor I have a lot of flexibility with my schedule. There are certain expectations that the church has of me, and rightly so. I need to be ready for the service on Sunday. I need to make sure my sermon is ready and well prepared. I need to make sure that I am looking after the general affairs of the church and encouraging people. Yet I have a lot of freedom in what I do when and with whom I meet where. I need to be in charge of my schedule.

My problem is that I love to be involved in many things. I like serving my church. I enjoy serving in my community. I am privileged to be part of the leadership team for the Rural Church Pastors Network. And I have access to wonderful courses and workshops that I believe will be enjoyable for me and contribute to me being a better me and doing a better job with all that is expected of me.

But I would never want people to think that I’m too busy for them or too busy to lead the church well. A full schedule that we are purposefullly and prayerfully filling is good, but let’s make sure we are never too “busy” to meet with the people we care about the most.